4 thoughts on “The Radical Choice of Militant Kindness by Malcolm Ivey

    1. Hi Jean, that’s an interesting observation which makes a lot of sense to me.

      The only potential ‘issue’, so to speak, is if we try and seek ego-death so that we do not have to feel the pain of hurtful words, criticism, shame or embarrassment.

      My understanding is that hurtful words might \always\ hurt a person’s ‘personality’. However, if we can move towards this pain fully, accepting it, rather than in anyway avoiding it, through actually embracing/welcoming the truth of what we feel deep inside, and an awareness of how this pain arises and ceases, a degree of freedom can be found.

      Best, Mike.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. As humans I think it is pretty much impossible to be completely free of ego (possibly a survival instinct). I like what you say about ‘welcoming the truth of what we feel deep inside’ and how it can be freeing to some degree. If someone is being hurtful towards me, whether intended or not, I don’t tend to let it affect me, much. However if it is directed towards another person, particularly someone I’m close to, it has a much bigger impact on me. I don’t bear grudges, so even if I am hurt, it’s not something that I carry with me afterwards, except for any lessons learned from the experience – that is also freeing, I suppose.


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