Six Life Lessons I've Learned while Visiting the Elderly - By Michael Baker

20 Comments

  1. Reblogged this on While there is life, there is hope! and commented:

    Touching article…
    The elderly people should enjoy their life in THEIR HOMES not in nursing homes… It is the saddest thing to see how these people are actually abused firstly by their families when they are taken away from their environment. It should be the common sense which dictate in a family environment. Elderly people are not giving to the families a bad time, their are having a bad time. FAMILY should be their support. As they were ago when raised the children.
    Thank you, Michael, for your article!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Simona,

      You’re right, it’s heartbreaking to see an elderly person abandoned by their family. These lonely old souls need love and support just like anybody else.

      What upsets me most is when I see a family member visiting and texting the whole time, or staring out the window like the visit is an annoying chore. I feel like saying, “This is your mother, your grandfather, your flesh and blood … sit there and be present in the moment with them for crying out loud … listen quietly to their stories … hold their hand … show that you care deeply about them.”

      I think people as a whole have just lost sight of what really matters in Life.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. How marvellous that a young person can learn such wisdom from the elderly and the sick and infirm and then put that knowledge into words. My mother is in a care home with dementia, and from visiting regularly I can see how much there is to learn from our older generation. But then I’m not exactly a spring chicken myself. I loved this post.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh, Michael, this brought a tear to my eyes. First, every aspect is beautifully written and engaging. I found myself wondering what each one of your learnings was. Second, you have a wisdom beyond your years. You say you are in your thirties, but I don’t know many of any age who speak with such insight, so mindfully and compassionately. When I was selling insurance 25 years ago, all of the agents in the office would direct the older people to me, knowing that I would sit with them in their homes for hours, chatting away. I love the wisdom of our older citizens. They have seen so much more in their lifetimes than I will ever see in mine. A very moving piece. Thank you for making the world a better place.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Michael, you are such a gift. Thank you for your writing and for helping others learn from your experience. Seniors are so often written off. It’s sad because they have so much they long to contribute. Thx for speaking up for them!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Michael, this is an amazing post and one I can absolutely relate to. My mum is now in an aged care facility as she needs 24/7 care so I’ve spent a lot of time there this past year. The elderly can teach us so much. A wonderful post.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thank you for this post and for your appreciation of the wisdom that comes even from just surviving a long life. It is heartwarming to me to be made aware of younger people who know this and are willing to give such compassionate attention to those lovely older people. I am “only” 70 and so far in pretty good shape. But if I ever need to live in a nursing home I pray there will be someone like yourself there.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Very nice my friend. I have always struggled with this issue. I was pulled from the adult psych unit to the geriatric psych unit several times as a mental health worker. And I visited my grandmother while she spent her final year in a nursing home. This is not my ministry, but I am so grateful for people like you. God bless you.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I saved your post and only just read it today. And, I am so glad I did. As a youngster, I was very shy and often avoided situations in which I would have to engage in conversation. In 1980, a friend invited me to join volunteers from The Holiday Project in visiting nursing home residents on Christmas Day. It changed my life. I had never felt like I was in an environment that was so non-judgmental, all accepting, and completely appreciative. Now, more than 35 years later, I still volunteer with The Holiday Project and have spent wonderful times with thousands of people who just want a little bit of attention and the knowledge that someone remembers and cares about them. I am glad that you do too.

    Liked by 2 people

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