59 comments

    1. This is a WONDERFUL lesson to us all! I too was a ‘hurry-hurry’ person, and luckily learned that hurry means worry, and worry I can do without. How amazing life is and how wonderful that we have this incredible moment in time to enjoy it. Thank you for this life-changing post. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  1. Reblogged this on Lizzie Carver and commented:

    “We’re going to miss everything if you don’t hurry up.”
    Or perhaps, unless you slow down, you are going to miss even more? This lovely post really resonated with me, so I am sharing it here – take your time to read and savour it, won’t you?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That was breath-taking. I re-lived all my “dying to self” moments all over again during your story… My children have since become teens who have rewarded me with a litany of all the things wrong with me…

    However, since my daughter has passed through the most difficult of those teen years, she now places her hands on my shoulders – often – and forces me to stop all other thought and action and, with a captive glance confesses, “I love you.”

    I love harvest time.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Oh my goodness. This is my youngest to a T. He is never in a rush for anything and he always comes home with a ton a treasures I never even noticed – – including money he’s found on the floor that no one else noticed!!! Make me laugh too that his favorite stuffed animal is the one in your first picture!! That is our Mr. Hoppy!!!

    Thanks for saying this so beautifully!!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you for this….I needed to read this. I am one of those “hurry up” moms…afraid to be late….feeling the need to get everything accomplished when clearly I missing the most important part of life….it’s time to chabge…Thank you…..

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I loved this post. Illness forced me to live my life slower and it has been a blessing. I love taking walks with kids and dogs. The walk is a constant stop and start but it is amazing the things you notice because you paused.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I love this. Years ago I caught myself saying, “Hurry up” to my daughter even when we weren’t in a hurry. “Wait,” I asked myself, “Why does she have to hurry? We have plenty time.” I realized that I was hurrying her through life because I was hurried through life. It was just an ingrained, unnecessary pattern. Congratulations for committing to change and giving your children an unhurried childhood.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you. I can’t even tell you how much I needed to read this. I have two “noticers” and I’m constantly rushing them. It didn’t even occur to me that I could be harming their beautiful personalities. Not to be too over dramatic. But thank you. I’m going to put down my phone after writing this comment and commit to enjoying my children, and life, more fully. Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Thanks you SO much. I felt like you’ve caught a glimpse into our morning-hell the evenings too. I recently took a job that starts early in the morning and my sweet, go at her own pace daughter has never adjusted. Even after 6 months of me working there. I’ll try to stop saying hurry up, it’ll make everything more peaceful 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you for your beautiful yet honest post. I, too, have been guilty of forcing my kids to “hurry up”. We’re in such a rush to get our things done, that we forget what life is truly about. A great reminder to appreciate my little ones’ abilities to just enjoy life — no gimmicks, no technology, no gadgets, just the simple things. That is my goal for 2015: stop rushing, and just breathe and enjoy the moment because we don’t get them back.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. i have three wonderful grown up children and when they each was growing up i made sure i played not rush them and had lots of fun and outings with them they are all wonderful parents and have each given me a grand child who i am enjoying every time i see them the youngest been 8 months old shes a pleasure to play and learn with then i have a grandson who is 12 i took him twice a week to playschool when he was little and we had the time of our lifes every day i saw him then my 15 year old grandaughter we used to make collages colour and draw and make necklaces with beads i love it all and children do make you happy and fulfill your life

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I was (and am) a noticer. Made my mother crazy! And it is hard on my husband. Fortunately, I got a noticer for a son. What a pleasure to finally have the company of someone who sees and pays attention. It has its challenges, but oh so many rewards. Thanks for finding the time for your noticer and for appreciating her gifts.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. This brought a smile as I am one of those “slow” people. Last Sunday, I was geocaching with my best friend and he became impatient with how much time it was taking me to write down the next cache coordinates, or take a photo, or stop to talk to a stranger sitting on a park bench. He attributes it to my being “retired” and easily distracted. Truth is, I had to conform to society’s expectations for my whole working/schooling life and finally, I am content to just Be. Not obsessed with time, schedules, or rushing to get to the next thing before I’ve had a chance to enjoy the moment fully. Great post. 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  13. What a beautiful article and it resonates deeply with me.
    I too have taken a step back and noticed that we can be the best mothers, just by being patient. No other skill compares to that of being patient and understanding. It’s so reassuring to know that other mums too are realising this.
    our children are little gifts that we must treasure.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Thank you for following my blog! This was a wonderful post – wish I had read it a long time ago. My husband’s and my lives with kids was Hurry Up and Wait! Each of them ran on their own time schedule. Now one runs on Army time and the other married a young man whose clock is slower than hers! Looking forward to slowing down with a grandchild.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Absolutely beautiful!! And eye-opening. I just saw myself with my second child. He is still never in a hurry today and he is 23 yo. And he still gives me lessons on working too hard and not taking time for myself. Thanks for the revelation!!

    Like

  16. My father was/is a hurrier. He was always trying to rush and push me into things that I had not or could not filter. I grew to resent him and close him out of my world. Everything didn’t have to be rush rush rush. To this day I cannot be around him because I think he may criticize me for not being quick enough or good enough. Children need time to be children. Rushing comes soon enough.

    Like

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