23 thoughts on “One ALS Patient’s Ability to Share His Kindness With Others – by Annie Mimi Hall

    1. Thank you for your comments. Yes, I am glad I was able to support him during this difficult time in his life.

      He was a special person and never stopped caring about others, even when his condition had deteriorated to the point where he was in a physically worse condition that they were.

      It was amazing to me that he always checked the safety and comfort of his roommate, even when his roommate was in better physical condition and clearly was going to live longer than he was.

      Thank you for reading ,
      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I believe that we need to see the person inside. A person’s worth is in their spirit and their heart. It is not in their appearance or their ability to speak or do things exactly the way other people do.

      We are all unique. When we become old or disabled, we are still the same special person we have always been. We still deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

      Thank you for reading and taking the time to comment.
      Annie

      Like

    1. I am sorry you had to watch the progression of this disease first hand. It is a scary and very sad thing to watch someone deteriorate physically, yet still maintain mental clarity.
      I am glad your father died peacefully in his sleep, but it is a terrible loss for you.

      I am glad you felt connection and meaning in my post. Thank you so much for reading.
      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words. They brought a tear to my eye. Situations like this one, of taking care of someone who is dying, are full of mixed emotions. I saw the things he did and I truly believed that his energy of compassion would have a positive effect in the world.

      There is always an effect on the world when we do things that are kind. We do not always see all of the results of our actions. In this case, his kind spirit still is having an effect on people, even after his death.

      We never know what happens after we do a kind act for another person, If someone is touched by something we do, they will pass it on in some way…. or even someone nearby who witnessed it, may pass it on.

      There is always something good that happens when we are compassionate and kind, even if we are not there to see it.

      Blessings,
      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I stopped by your blog and it is lovely. Thank you for your kind words about this story about my beloved friend. I am glad I was able to honor him in this way. It was the least I could do, for all the courage he showed and taught me.
      Blessings,
      Annie

      Like

  1. Thank you for sharing. What many persons giving care forget is to give care, show respect for the person and their dignity. Caring is more than a job, because care needs to be centred on the individual for we are not all the same.

    You are enabling them to live their own lives how this wish to and not how others feel they should. Just because a person does not have the ability to care for themselves, the carer should abide by the persons wishes on how they want to be cared for.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much for saying that 🙂 This was a unique situation for me. It is nearly unheard of for a nurse or a nurse aide to end up in the same facility they worked in, during the time frame that their original co-workers are still working there. I have only seen residents who used to be nurses 50 years ago, end up in our facility.
      The main thing that I remember about my friend is that he cared very much about the residents. He always took time to see how people were feeling.
      Thank you for taking the time to comment.
      Annie

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Wow! This mirrors my experience to a tee (well almost). I didn’t know Dave, my ALS friend before starting at the NH in town. I am a RN and he was a 45 year old man living in the Nursing Home on my unit. He was ornery, so we became friends very quickly, but I also saw people treating him like a “task” to complete during their shift. (as they do with all the pts really) but like you said he is cognitively aware and it’s disrespectful to be treated in that way. This man is a local hero if you will, the community idolizes this man. It is amazing the love they have for him. He was teacher/coach and a very positive role model for the children in our community before his diagnosis of ALS. Even more so after his diagnosis. This man deserves so much but is stuck with this stupid disease. He also is always concerned with others more than himself and never complains about his situation. I quickly became his favorite. But I treated him no differently than I would if he didn’t have ALS. Well except doing the things he can’t do for him of course. And I also had an experience like yours. He was going out of town to visit family and apparently the people helping him get into the car didn’t have a clue what they were doing. I get paged overhead and was told that I needed to go help them. By the time I had gotten out there, the DON was there, 2 CNA’s, and his caregiver that was staying with him out of town. All with their own opinions and ideas of what to do, and they really didn’t have a clue. He was angry trying to yell, which made it harder to understand him, the DON was trying to tell him that he couldn’t do this and that and not just listening to him or even acknowledging anything he was saying. This man is determined in everything he does so telling him that he can’t do something is exactly what you don’t want to do! So after watching this for a couple min. I finally just said ok just stop. Let me have him, so I got in front of him, made some smart ass comment to lighten the situation and to make him smile (which he did) and I said ok listen, lets do this my way ok and he gave in and said ok (he could never get mad at me or tell me no) So I gave him a bear hug, put his arms on my shoulders and we pivoted and sat down in the car. DONE. He smiled at me and said thanks. I understand it can be hard to see past the exterior appearance but they are very much the same person they were before and should be treated as such.
    I started bawling when I read the last sentence of your story. My Dave is still with us and relating so much to your story made it very hard to read that. Thanks for telling your story.

    Liked by 1 person

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