44 thoughts on “Richard and Molly, A True Story From the Assisted Living Facility – by Annie Mimi Hall

    1. Yes it was truly a miracle for both of them. I just saw the picture that kindness blog put for this post. The man looks just like Richard ! He actually wears a hat all the time, just like that and he has the same glasses!
      Molly is similar but more fashionable. She used to be a model in New York ans she has retained her sense of beauty, style and self esteem in her appearance, even in the early to mid stages of dementia. That too is a blessing and a miracle!
      Just thought you would enjoy knowing that 🙂
      Annie

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    1. You are right about “noticing” this. There are lots of people who work at nursing homes and they do not really “notice” the stories that unfold. I think it is the same everywhere. There are beautiful things in the midst of the trauma and sadness. If we look around us, we can enjoy life better, by seeing the beauty.
      Thank you so much for reading and commenting.
      Annie

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for reading and taking the time to comment. I am glad this story meant so much to people.

      I think that when we find out that there is still possibility for love in old age, it gives us hope. There is still hope for happiness, even after the death of a spouse.

      There are other couples that have met in nursing home / assisted living and they give each other companionship and friendship. They hold hands and sit together at dinner.

      One of the men bought his companion a beautiful diamond ring and they play cards together in the evening in the lounge. One day I accidentally walked in on them while they were “cuddling” on the sofa in one of their rooms. I quickly shut the door. I felt a little embarrassed but I also thought “I hope that is me at that age! It is so nice that they still have passion and love, in their 90’s ! “

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    1. Parkinson’s and dementia are both very hard diseases for the people and for the families to deal with. It is sad to watch them getting worse. But both of these diseases are very slow and progressive. The best thing is to enjoy the moments. It is the moments in life that have value. Mindfulness about watching and seeing the beauty in certain special moments will help you to get through these hard times.
      Thank you for sharing,
      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I am glad if it helped a little bit. I was thinking of writing more posts about dealing with a loved one with dementia.There are a lot of people who need to understand what is going to happen and what their role should be.
          Everyone is different. You can only do what you can do.

          The more family and friends you have as a support system the better. Sometimes you will just need a little break and need someone to take over for you. There is even such a thing as RESPITE care, and most insurance companies cover it. respite care is a time frame that care will be provided for a family member with a disease, in order for the primary caregiver to get a mental break.

          It has been studied that even a very loving family member will burn out from performing day to day care for a long time.
          I wish you well and I know you will remain strong. Just remember that even though it is the other family members who are sick, you are also a person and you are equally affected by the situation.

          Reach out for help if you need to. Know your limitations.
          Even people who visit their spouse or their mother in the nursing home every day can get burned out.They need a break. I know one family that has friends that take a turn once in a while. They do in every day to visit the mom, so that the daughters can go on vacation or just take a break at home.

          take care,
          Annie

          Liked by 2 people

    1. It is very hard to have a parent with Alzheimer’s disease. I feel for you. I see the families deal with it all the time, and it is never easy for them. No matter what stage of Alzheimer’s they are in, you can usually create special moments with them, Once they are at a certain stage of dementia, they live by the moment. They do not remember what they had for lunch but they do understand that you are holding their hand right now.
      They understand when someone ins caring about them and they also understand when someone is angry with them (or near them)
      Showing kindness will bring reward to you. Treasure the special moments in your heart. You will be able to keep them forever.
      Annie

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  1. Reblogged this on Baby Boomers and More and commented:

    The development of new friendships in LTC settings can be very comforting, as was the case with Molly and Richard. Sometimes these relationships blossom while still married to someone else. It takes extreme kindness and understanding for the cognizant spouse to allow that comfort to exist for their memory impaired loved one. It’s not a breaking of ones wedding vows, rather, it’s a celebration of still having the ability to give and receive love.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes I have seen that and your perspective is very insightful and open minded. It is easy for people to judge other, when they have never been in the situation themselves. There are times when someone needs the comfort of another human.
      Thank you for taking the time to discuss this issue,
      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

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